Gardens in Sri Lanka

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Sri Lanka has diverse flora with most of the plant species found in tropical and sub-tropical areas. The island hosts a great deal of plant species in its botanic gardens. Five state-run botanical gardens preserve the nurseries of this diversified flora.

Tropical rainforests are natural preservers of this flora. Most of these plants and trees are native to Indian sub-continent, but Sri Lanka has species that belong to tropical areas of Americas and West Indies. For example, frangipani is West Indian native flourishing in Sri Lanka like a proud native.

Sri Lanka has three botanical gardens spread around the hilly areas and two in the coastal areas at Colombo and Hambantota. The oldest of these is Royal Botanical Garden at Peradeniya, which was first used by King Wikramabahu III in 1371. Royal Botanical Garden preserves about 4000 species of plants, and this is also the biggest plant nursery in the country with 147 acres of land. Garden pictures of this place will tell you the whole story through the camera lens if you have not visited this magical enchanting old garden.

Hakgala botanical garden extends to 70 acres. This botanical garden is reputed for flower nurseries and rose flower garden locally and among visitors. Hakgala is an excellent collection of gardens, flowers and trees of the tropical and sub-tropical areas. The garden hosts 10,000 species of flora and interests 500,000 visitors every year.

Mirijjawila Botanical Garden is the first dry zone botanical garden in Sri Lanka. This garden was planned for the preservation of dry zone flora especially flowers and horticulture. The preservatory has large flower nursery and one of the most beautiful flower gardens.  Unlike Mirijjawila, Seetawaka Botanical Garden, is a wet zone botanical garden. This garden serves as a research place and a preservatory for endangered floral species of the area.

Henarathgoda Botanical Garden was set up for rubber plantation by the British. Later, after independence, Sri Lanka turned this rubber garden to plant nursery flower gardens. State Botanical Department has a repository of pictures of gardens.

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